The Struggle is Real: Living With Anxiety

It seems in today’s modern age all too easy to experience, struggle with, be overwhelmed by anxiety. Anxieties of all sorts whether it be worrying about our health, running late to an appointment, our work performance, financial insecurities… we could add to this list endlessly. Anxiety runs rampant across our country as the most clinically common form of mental illness.

The Twitter hashtag #ThisIsWhatAnxietyFeelsLike trending heavily in 2017 highlights several common examples of the ways in which people experience anxiety.

From relationships…

 

To texting…

 

Everyday errands…

 

Even just going to bed.

 

Sometimes it’s a simple as…

 

And sometimes it is as overwhelming as…

What are we to do with all of this anxiety and stress? The first step, in this writer’s very humble opinion, is to recognize the truth of the matter in that there is no actual stress or anxiety outside of our own minds. There are not people inflicted with stress, but rather people engaging in stressful thinking.

The degree to which we perceive and subsequently accept our reality, the circumstances of the world around us, is directly correlated to levels of anxiety our perspectives create. Additionally, the deeper the attachment we have to our own Ego the more likely it is our thinking will feel uncontrollable when our Ego feels threatened. Whereas, the deeper our sense of connection is with Source the more likely it is we will experience life in the moment, free of incessant thought cycles of events yet to unfold.

It is natural from animals to experience stress and anxiety cued by environmental factors. Take a deer for example. A deer walking through the woods searching for food has a natural stress response when it hears the cracking of a branch, or rustling of leaves, nearby as it prepares the deer for a possible predator. It is NOT natural for us humans to experience anxiety to the degree that we do.

The wounds and traumas within our minds that lead to overwhelming anxiety vary greatly from person to person. Some can take short periods of time and small doses of medications to help and routine therapy to heal from. While others can take years of intensive work and vigilant practice in re-wiring the way one’s brain works. Either way it is a process of healing, not just coping.

For simple 10 steps on how to manage your stress and anxiety, you need look no further than Dr. Wayne Dyer’s article here: https://www.healyourlife.com/10-stress-management-strategies-from-wayne-dyer